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Kids’ Supplements – What Supplements Should I Give My Child?


Even with the healthiest diet, children and adolescents might not get optimal amounts of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and other critical nutrients. 

Research shows that kids often fail to get the recommended intakes of minerals including iron, zinc, and magnesium. Other studies show a low intake of vitamins A, C, and E among children, while adolescents are notably low in the mineral magnesium. 

Those nutrient deficiencies present several challenges for children: 

1. Optimal nutrition can help prevent disease development, especially to protect against chronic diseases. 

2. Learning healthy habits — including getting the right nutrients — help children develop healthy habits they can carry into adulthood. 

3. Nutrients play critical roles in a child’s growth and development. For instance, adolescents develop about 40% of total bone mass within a 3-5 year window. Getting sufficient nutrients during that period — including vitamin D3 and calcium — determines their bone mass as adults, which could predict fracture risk later in life. 



RELATED ARTICLE: Raising Happy, Stress-Free Kids


Growing up today offers many unique experiences for children, such as being able to socialize online, play life-like video games, and complete homework faster with computers. Yet, kids today also face many health challenges: frequent stress, low physical activity, poor-quality food, and exposure to more toxins than kids from past generations. As a result, children get sick often and suffer from more chronic diseases, including asthma, anxiety, and obesity.†


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Kid's Health Perspective



Growing up today offers many unique experiences for children, such as being able to socialize online, play life-like video games, and complete homework faster with computers. Yet, kids today also face many health challenges: frequent stress, low physical activity, poor-quality food, and exposure to more toxins than kids from past generations.(1) 


As a result, children get sick often and suffer from more chronic diseases, including asthma, anxiety, and obesity.(2) Keep your child happy, healthy, and balanced with these strategies. 


†These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

References 

1. Steinberger J, Daniels SR, Eckel RH, et al. Progress and Challenges in Metabolic Syndrome in Children and Adolescents. Circ. 2009;119:628–647. 

2. Bethell, C., Kogan, M., Strickland, B., Schor, E., Robertson, J. and Newacheck, P. (2019). A National and State Profile of Leading Health Problems and Health Care Quality for US Children: Key Insurance Disparities and Across-State Variations. Acad Pediatr. 2011;11(3-Supplement):S22–S33. 

3. Stanford Children’s Health. Accident Statistics. Stanford Children’s Health. https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=accident-statistics-90-P02853. Accessed June 13, 2019. 

4. Birth Injury Guide. Causes of Birth Trauma. Birth Injury Guide. https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/birth-injury/types/birth-trauma/. Accessed June 13, 2019. 

5. Chiropractic Care During Pregnancy: Safety and Benefits. American Pregnancy Association. https://americanpregnancy.org/pregnancy-health/chiropractic-care-during-pregnancy/. Updated November 8, 2017. Accessed May 10, 2019. 

6. Chiropractic care for children: Controversies and issues. Paediatr Child Health. 2002;7(2):85–104. 

7. Bray GA. How bad is fructose?. Am J Clin Nutr . 2007;86(4):895–896. 

8. American Heart Association. Sugar 101. American Heart Association. Updated April 17, 2019. Accessed June 13, 2019. 

9. Ludwig DS, Peterson KE, Gortmaker SL. Relation between consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks and childhood obesity: a prospective, observational analysis. Lancet 2001;357:505–08. 

10. Sturm R, Powell LM, Chriqui JF, Chaloupka FJ. Soda Taxes, Soft Drink Consumption, And Children’s Body Mass Index. Health Aff. 2010;29(5). doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2009.0061 

11. Frary CD, Johnson RK, Wang MQ. Children and adolescents' choices of foods and beverages high in added sugars are associated with intakes of key nutrients and food groups. J Adolesc Health. 2004;34(1):56-63. 

12. Benbrook CM. Trends in glyphosate herbicide use in the United States and globally. Environ Sci Eur. 2016;28(1):3. doi:10.1186/s12302-016-0070-013. Verma C, Nanda S, Singh RK, Singh RB, Mishra S. A Revie on Impacts of Genetically Modified Food on Human Health. Open Nutraceuticals J. 2011;4:3-11. 

14. Salbego J, Pretto A, Gioda CR, et al. Herbicide formulation with glyphosate affects growth, acetylcholinesterase activity, and metabolic and hematological parameters in piava (Leporinus obtusidens). Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 2010;58(3):740-5. 

15. Children. Pesticide Action Network. http://www.panna.org/human-health-harms/children. Accessed May 10, 2019. 

16. Uauy R, Castillo C. Lipid requirements of infants: implications for nutrient composition of fortified complementary foods. J Nutr. 2003;133(9):2962S-72S. 

17. Monteiro C, Cannon G, Moubarac J, Levy R, Louzad, M, Jaime P. The UN Decade of Nutrition, the NOVA food classification and the trouble with ultra-processing. Public Health Nutr. 2018;21(1), 5-17. 

18. Braithwaite I, Stewart AW, Hancox RJ, et al. Fast-food consumption and body mass index in children and adolescents: an international cross-sectional study. BMJ Open. 2014;4(12):e005813. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005813 

19. National Sleep Foundation. How Much Sleep Do Babies and Kids Need? National Sleep Foundation. https://www.sleepfoundation.org/excessive-sleepiness/support/how-much-sleep-do-babies-and-kids-need. Accessed June 14, 2019. 

20. National Sleep Foundation. The Sneaky Ways That Blue Light Can Interfere With Your Kids' Sleep. National Sleep Foundation. https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/how-blue-light-affects-kids-sleep. Accessed May 10, 2019. 

21. McGonigal K. The Upside of Stress. New York, NY: Penguin Random House, LLC; 2015. 

22. Fedewa A, Cornelius C, Ahn S. The use of bicycle workstations to increase physical activity in secondary classrooms. Health Psychology Report. 2017;6(1):60-74. 

23. Bidzan-Bluma I, Lipowska M. Physical Activity and Cognitive Functioning of Children: A Systematic Review. International journal of environmental research and public health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5923842/. Updated April 19, 2018. Accessed May 10, 2019. 

24. WebMD. The Facts About Bisphenol A, BPA. WebMD. https://www.webmd.com/children/bpa#1. Updated December 5, 2017. Accessed May 10, 2019.25. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use: A Proposed Rule by the Food and Drug Administration. https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/02/26/2019-03019/sunscreen-drug-products-for-over-the-counter-human-use. Published February 26, 2019. Accessed June 14, 2019. 

26. Linos E, Keiser E, Fu T, Colditz G, Chen S, Tang JY. Hat, shade, long sleeves, or sunscreen? Rethinking US sun protection messages based on their relative effectiveness. Cancer Causes Control. 2011;22(7):1067–1071. 

27. Griffin RM. Safer Bug Spray: Natural Bug Repellents. WebMD. https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/features/safer-bug-spray-natural-bug-repellents#1. Updated June 9, 2009. Accessed June 25, 2019. 

28. Koren G, Matsui D, Bailey B. DEET-based insect repellents: safety implications for children and pregnant and lactating women. CMAJ. 2003;169(3):209-212. 

29. Landrigan PL, Goldman LR. Children’s Vulnerability To Toxic Chemicals: A Challenge And Opportunity To Strengthen Health And Environmental Policy. Health Affairs. 2011;30(5). doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0151 

30. Grigg J. Environmental toxins; their impact on children's health. Archives of Disease in Childhood. https://adc.bmj.com/content/89/3/244. Updated March 1, 2004. Accessed May 10, 2019. 

31. Siti Zulaikha R, Sharifah Norkhadijah SI, Praveena SM. Hazardous Ingredients in Cosmetics and Personal Care Products and Health Concern: A Review. Public Health Res. 2015, 5(1):7-15. 


Disclaimer 

This content is for information purposes only. Any statement or recommendation in this publication does not take the place of medical advice nor is meant to replace the guidance of your licensed healthcare practitioner. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. MaxLiving information is and products are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease or provide medical advice. Decisions to use supplements to support your specific needs should be considered in partnership with your licensed healthcare practitioner.